Aloha

Purple Maiʻa Foundation is a technology education nonprofit whose mission is to inspire and educate the next generation of culturally grounded, community serving technology makers. We teach coding and computer science through after school and elective classes to Native Hawaiian students, low-income youth, and others who are underrepresented in tech. As we increase access to tech education we also ground students in the knowledge that their ancestors were indigenous innovators who used their skills and perspective to serve their communities and lands.

He maiʻa ke kanaka a ka lā e hua ai

We support Hawaiian values in contemporary tech culture, and we think that by learning to innovate as indigenous technologists, we can be part of a global shift toward growing more sustainable and just societies. You can learn more about work in this area by visiting Purpleprize.com.

The Challenge & Opportunity

Underrepresentation of Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, low-income, and other students persists in part because indigenous and other non-western cultures have been stereotypically portrayed as antithetical to excellence in technology and innovation. This carries down into students not “seeing themselves” as potentially good at computer science and feeling like existing educational spaces for CS aren’t welcoming or affirming.

However, the simplified opposition of culture/community vs. technology can be challenged with CS classrooms that run in a culturally grounded way.

This means hiring kumu who strive for technical excellence and are from the same communities they serve who have aloha and passion for working with youth. We make the link between indigenous ecological technologies (like the ʻauwai, loko iʻa, and others) and contemporary digital innovation, teaching CS in concert with place-based, culture-based, and ʻāina-based education.

The Challenge & Opportunity

Underrepresentation of Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, low-income, and other students persists in part because indigenous and other non-western cultures have been stereotypically portrayed as antithetical to excellence in technology and innovation. This carries down into students not “seeing themselves” as potentially good at computer science and feeling like existing educational spaces for CS aren’t welcoming or affirming.

However, the simplified opposition of culture/community vs. technology can be challenged with CS classrooms that run in a culturally grounded way.

This means hiring kumu who strive for technical excellence and are from the same communities they serve who have aloha and passion for working with youth. We make the link between indigenous ecological technologies (like the ʻauwai, loko iʻa, and others) and contemporary digital innovation, teaching CS in concert with place-based, culture-based, and ʻāina-based education.

MAHALO TO OUR SUPPORTERS & PARTNERS

We mahalo nui all of the generous and supportive organizations and
individuals who make it possible for Purple Mai’a to do its work.